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also like… may You

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14.05.2018

Content:

  • also like… may You
  • Follow the Author
  • Frequently bought together
  • Why do we get so embarrassed when a colleague wears the same shirt? Why do we eat the same thing for breakfast every day, but seek out novelty at lunch. You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice and millions of other books are available for instant access. Ships from and sold by jmhw.info You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice Paperback – April 18, Editorial Reviews. Review. “[A] lively, wide-ranging study The footnotes have a David Foster Wallace-like wit as Vanderbilt calls our attention to such issues as.

    also like… may You

    There are very interesting parts where the author interviews experts such as the Netflix guy in charge of recommendations or the guy who tests MREs for palatability but far too much of the book is filled with the author's navel-gazing fluff. Not surprisingly the published excerpts are from the good parts. Thus the book is significantly worse than expected. A deep, detailed look at a field which has puzzled the greatest of science and philosophy. This is a very highly entertaining, well written and yet fantastically detailed look not only at the issues of taste, flavor, culture and elitism, but also about the science and philosophy of identifying and quantifying those things which are nearly impossible to define.

    I stopped reading, for the second time, to write this review. Was I destined to write a review? The book so totally bored me, I quit reading it. But then I returned because I so liked "Traffic. Bach versus a fictitious composer named Buxtehude. If nothing else, this is a mark of terrible research. Does this catch your attention: Which, has nothing at all to do with taste.

    Show me one first-world adult who did NOT actually eat too much of a favorite food as a child? This isn't instinct at all, it's cold hard experience.

    And furthermore, if you are in one, the people close to you will know that no matter what appearance you try to create. But, arguably, this is too deep for what Vanderbilt set out to do. Vanderbilt does not tell us. Let's just hope his next book is more in line with his considerable skills. I saw this book recommended on Amazon, and thought it sounded interesting.

    The first chapter on taste was fascinating. But then I found the chapters to get overly long and dull. I skipped half of chapter 4, the last 5 pages of 5 and then given how the final chapter was estimated at 58 minutes for me, threw in the towel.

    I think the book could gain from some brevity, but there is still a lot of interesting stuff here. Bought it after reading a review thinking it would be fun. It turned out to be much better than I expected - fun and also profound.

    Science, philosophy, marketing, all come together. How many books quote Locke and Kant, and talk about judging cats or beer?

    Whenever I read a pop science or pseudo-science book, whether by Malcolm Gladwell or anyone else, I check the footnotes, endnotes or bibliography first to get an idea of how well the author claims to have researched the subject. Then I will choose a few random references and see if the author seems to be interpreting the reference accurately. There are many pseudo-science books where authors appear to provide citations, but in fact the references have nothing to do with the subject or the author has misinterpreted and so on.

    Tom Vanderbilt has provided 62 pages of endnotes and they correlate with his writing. His writing is very clear and he incorporates much very serious academic and scientific work seamlessly in language a layperson can readily grasp.

    The content itself never rises to the level of true research and it is not intended to. Rather Vanderbilt explores the mechanics of tastes, posited he says by his daughter asking him about his favorite color and number. He goes into current and past work on how and why people develop tastes and how they exercise them and how knowledge of taste formation is used as a marketing tool. Thus the book is significantly worse than There are very interesting parts where the author interviews experts such as the Netflix guy in charge of recommendations or the guy who tests MREs for palatability but far too much of the book is filled with the author's navel-gazing fluff.

    Not surprisingly the published excerpts are from the good parts. Thus the book is significantly worse than expected. A deep, detailed look at a field which has puzzled the greatest of science and philosophy. This is a very highly entertaining, well written and yet fantastically detailed look not only at the issues of taste, flavor, culture and elitism, but also about the science and philosophy of identifying and quantifying those things which are nearly impossible to define.

    I stopped reading, for the second time, to write this review. Was I destined to write a review? The book so totally bored me, I quit reading it. But then I returned because I so liked "Traffic.

    Bach versus a fictitious composer named Buxtehude. If nothing else, this is a mark of terrible research. Does this catch your attention: Which, has nothing at all to do with taste. Show me one first-world adult who did NOT actually eat too much of a favorite food as a child? This isn't instinct at all, it's cold hard experience. And furthermore, if you are in one, the people close to you will know that no matter what appearance you try to create.

    But, arguably, this is too deep for what Vanderbilt set out to do. Vanderbilt does not tell us. Let's just hope his next book is more in line with his considerable skills. I saw this book recommended on Amazon, and thought it sounded interesting. The first chapter on taste was fascinating. But then I found the chapters to get overly long and dull.

    I skipped half of chapter 4, the last 5 pages of 5 and then given how the final chapter was estimated at 58 minutes for me, threw in the towel. I think the book could gain from some brevity, but there is still a lot of interesting stuff here. Bought it after reading a review thinking it would be fun.

    It turned out to be much better than I expected - fun and also profound. Science, philosophy, marketing, all come together. How many books quote Locke and Kant, and talk about judging cats or beer? Whenever I read a pop science or pseudo-science book, whether by Malcolm Gladwell or anyone else, I check the footnotes, endnotes or bibliography first to get an idea of how well the author claims to have researched the subject.

    Then I will choose a few random references and see if the author seems to be interpreting the reference accurately. There are many pseudo-science books where authors appear to provide citations, but in fact the references have nothing to do with the subject or the author has misinterpreted and so on.

    Tom Vanderbilt has provided 62 pages of endnotes and they correlate with his writing. His writing is very clear and he incorporates much very serious academic and scientific work seamlessly in language a layperson can readily grasp. The content itself never rises to the level of true research and it is not intended to.

    Rather Vanderbilt explores the mechanics of tastes, posited he says by his daughter asking him about his favorite color and number. He goes into current and past work on how and why people develop tastes and how they exercise them and how knowledge of taste formation is used as a marketing tool. Liz Fosslien and Mollie West Duffy. Sex, Power, and Partisanship. The Orchid and the Dandelion. Notes on a Nervous Planet. Some of My Friends Are….

    Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson. The Law of Small Things. The Handbook for Highly Sensitive People. No Hard Feelings Sticker Pack. Waiting for First Light. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson. The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing. The Psychology of Managing Pressure.

    The Tao of Trauma. Duncan and Kathy L. Say What You Mean. Healing Trauma with Guided Drawing.

    Follow the Author

    You May Also Like has ratings and reviews. Kater said: I picked this book for one reason: Tom Vanderbilt. I absolutely loved his book TRAFFIC, an. Why do we like what we like – this band or that ice-cream flavour? Is it biological or cultural? And what role do Amazon and Netflix play in. You May Also Like. Taste In An Age Of Endless Choice. Published by Knopf. you may also like From the best-selling author of Traffic, an enlightening and.

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    Comments

    newentry

    You May Also Like has ratings and reviews. Kater said: I picked this book for one reason: Tom Vanderbilt. I absolutely loved his book TRAFFIC, an.

    seregaw

    Why do we like what we like – this band or that ice-cream flavour? Is it biological or cultural? And what role do Amazon and Netflix play in.

    gogasb

    You May Also Like. Taste In An Age Of Endless Choice. Published by Knopf. you may also like From the best-selling author of Traffic, an enlightening and.

    kutya1

    Compre o livro You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice na jmhw.info: confira as ofertas para livros em inglês e importados.

    azone999

    A figure known as the “hipster barista” makes an appearance in Tom Vanderbilt's “You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice,” a.

    warc63

    The science behind the choices we make. After insightfully scrutinizing vehicular driving habits, Vanderbilt (Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We.

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